Category Archives: Videos

Now at Uniform Stories

Your pal Happy is proud to be included as a guest blogger over at Uniform Stories.

Uniform Stories allows you to upload a video about your experiences in uniform, no matter the type, and you know I’ll tell you that is a powerful medium.

Head on over and take a look at the site and watch a few videos and I invite you to upload your own.

If your uniform could tell 1 story, what would it be?

See you there.

Shared Narrative vs Personal Narrative in Apple Ad and why you should care

I speak on a number of topics, one of them being technology pros and cons for potential Fire Service Candidates through Fire Alumni.
It goes beyond the usual talks about the dangers of the evil social media and gives candidates tools they can use to better use the medium for their benefit.
In the presentation I discuss personal vs shared narrative as a way of addressing their desire to use the medium to communicate.  It’s not much use to tell you not to do something if I can’t explain WHY it is not a good idea.

Personal narrative is like a first person recollection of free cialis online an event.
Shared narrative is including others in the event while simultaneously removing oneself from the event in order to do so.

I give 2 examples.

One is where a couple witnesses a romantic sunset and decides to photograph themselves with the sunset behind them. While they did experience the sunset, they also had to interrupt their personal narrative to arrange the photo, in which they are no longer enjoying the very thing they are hoping to share.

The second example is when I finally talked my young daughters into wanting to watch Star Wars.

We got bundled up on the couch, drinks and snacks at the ready and I started the DVD. The Lucas Film logo appeared and I suddenly wanted to share this personal narrative with friends, family and the girls when they got older. I crouched down in front of them and snapped a pic.
However, while I was doing that my eldest said, “Daddy, what do those words say?”

I had missed the opening scroll. Forever. I will never have that moment back.
My desire to share interrupted my experience of the moment.

According to the candidates that approach me following the presentation, this message is well received.

In order to keep errors on social media at bay, focus on personal narrative.

Today this Apple ad was circulating the interwebs machine and I think it perfectly encapsulates the importance of personal narrative.
Have a look:

The kid in the ad is ALWAYS on his phone.  Like I am most days I’ll admit, but we assume from most of the ad he is texting or playing a game (Like I likely am, remember, I’ve fallen victim to the allure of the shared narrative) but we later learn he is making a clever little video.

We see the family becoming emotional at certain parts of the video, not because of what they see, but because of the emotions they associate with the memory of the events being shown.  They are being shown events they took part in.  The kid who made the video did not take part, he filmed them.  Each of the images has him removed from the event in an effort to later share it with the people in the image.  For the family it is a reminder of personal narrative, for the kid it is only shared narrative.

The exact same error I made with my daughters and Star Wars Apple wants us to believe is a good reason to use their products.

I love the idea of collecting and editing video on a handheld device.

I don’t love the assumption that ignoring the present to revisit in the future should be our priority.  Our priority should be to live in the now, be with the people we are with and in the place we are in, not to post a clever status or photo to include others, but truly experience life while it happens.  If that later leads to a sharing of events, so be it, but just wait.

 

Imagine the family Christmas celebration this family could have had if the kid on the phone had taken part instead of filming.  We’d have no clever little video, but we would have the same memories and perhaps even more to talk about instead of looking to technology to share every moment at the expense of the moment itself.  Just as powerful to me would have been if the child was constantly reading a book the whole time, then stood and recounted all the fun times he witnessed.  he still would have missed the events themselves while reading.  It’s not the phone that is to blame here, it is the desire to share the experience before the experience has been…well…experienced.

 

I tell Fire Service Candidates that social media is not dangerous, it’s how you use it that is.  Technology has made it so easy to share anything with anyone at anytime the urge to transfer personal narrative to shared narrative can be difficult to overcome, but the only way to be truly successful and enjoy life is to do just that: Live Now.  Post Later.

Being a Fireman, as imagined by children

I’m going to need 4 minutes of your time for this training video.

 

I think I worked with this guy down in District 4 20 years ago.

EMS Flashmob

Eli Beer formed an all volunteer First Aid/EMS group when he was 17.  In the process of developing the program he volunteered on an ambulance and was always upset when they would get stuck in traffic.

Eli attributed his dying patients’ demise on the extended response time and wanted to do more for them in the time between when they needed help and when help arrived.

This video goes directly to the core of the Response Time argument and it is important to make a clear distinction between first response and ambulance response times.

We can all agree that getting someone in the door quickly can help guide the rest of the system’s response.  This can be a fire department engine, an EMT Police Officer or perhaps a third service handling first response.  What we don’t need is to send a reclined cot van on every call, nor does it need to get there in 4 minutes most of the time to make a difference.

In this TEDMED talk, Eli talks about how he came to found United Hatzalah and send motorcycles he calls “Ambucycles” to the scene of an emergency to help until an ambulance can arrive.  He touts a 3 minute response time to over 207,000 incidents last year and is using mobile technology to achieve it.

The phone app broadcasts the medical incident to the 5 closest volunteers in the same way CPR needed apps do so in the states.  When he mentioned it was kind of like an EMS flash mob he had my attention.  We’re locked into some old ideas and this one breaks the mold.

 

Why aren’t we as communities encouraging this kind of organization?  Sure there are volunteer First Aid Squads all over, but this is far far simpler than that.  And don’t wave the liability flag here, those folks would have to be trained to get access to the app and with the right kind of basic QA program built in you’re golden.

What do you think of the various things mentioned in this video?

  • Motorcycle first response
  • Volunteers
  • Phone App dispatching

 

The Real Problem with the Miami Dade Angry Captain Video

Surely you’ve all seen Statter911 and FireLaw’s take on the Miami Dade Angry Captain for shouting at the public for…well…I can’t figure out why.  Dude wants to shoot video in public, dude can.  Dude isn’t covered by HIPAA.  Curt mentions a safety zone, dude is across the street.  My young daughters and I were closer than this when REACH landed at a firehouse on open house day.  No shouting was involved.  This is Risk Management in reverse, placing so much fear into providers about cameras that they snap thinking they’re going to get fined for a violation.  Only to make them look a fool the world over.

Let’s take a few IF pills, shall we?

IF, somehow, the video catches some kind of PHI (Protected Health Information) there is no HIPAA violation.  If the crew inadvertantly loses a PCR sheet in the prop wash and the guy on the camera picks it up…maybe, just maybe that could be considered…MAYBE…and incidental disclosure of PHI.

The fine?

Nothing.

So long as the agency can prove they did as much as they could to prevent the paper from flying away, no harm no foul.

 

There, isn’t that easy?

So why all the fear around the privacy legislation?  Because it’s changing?  Have you read the changes?  Still won’t include dude on the sidewalk, still won’t fine you for letting dude film and still won’t require personal liability insurance in the event of an incidental disclosure no matter what the insurance salesman tells you.

 

After dozens of pages determining if your agency must comply with the legislation, HIPAA says this: (paraphrasing)

“Don’t be a dick. Don’t tell stories about people or take pictures or use their personal information, OK?”

It does not mention violating the freedom of the press in the name of a law you never read and clearly do not understand.  GRANTED the Angery Captain never mentions HIPAA in his request for code 3 PD (I can hear Motorcop’s eyes rolling), my guess is that was the reason for his outburst.

 

More importantly…WHAT IS THAT TRANSPORT UNIT?!?!

That thing is a BEAST!  I cringe looking at the front overhang and thinking of some of the hills in San Francisco.  Sure we have Engines, Trucks and Squads with overhangs, but they are much higher centered.  And a crew cab?  I like it for the future of EMS being more centered on getting patients places without having to recline them, but dang, that’s a lot of space.  Can anyone speak to the history of this design in Miama Dade?  I like the idea of something new, but it still looks like a box on a frame.  It appears to be a Spartan RT.

Is the Captain in the video Angry abou these rigs perhaps?

the Crossover Episode 22 – Hanging Out

The boys are back!

What do you mean from where and who cares?

We’re doing the show LIVE from now on using Google Hang out, a part of Google+

Thursday nights 8pm Pacific, fire up the computer and come have a chat with us!

Go home apparatus doors, you’re drunk

Caught this video from Sydney from youtube superuser www911rescuede.

Dig the apparatus doors.  First the side opening ones…then the…well…you’ll see.

CalFire Air Ops up close – VIDEO

Our good pal Dylan, noted BlogStalker, childhood Explorer Scout friend and Chief Programmer at GasdaSoftware got a surprise while out back the other day:

 

CalFire was responding to a slow moving fire that proved difficult to access on Sept 3rd.  It was on site of the Concord Naval Weapons Station, a deactivated WWII munitions depot primed for development if anyone can figure out how to remove all the ordinance. While we could smell the smoke at HMHQ Dylan, from Gasda Software, had a far better vantage point.  I’d be curious to hear the pilot’s thoughts about all the kids at the edge of the pond.

 

And yes, that’s a separate helicopter.

 

Thanks for the video Dylan!

Big Brother or Caught in the Act? SF Buses to Issue Parking Tickets

Flick user Forty PhotographsParking in San Francisco is not a nightmare, but more of a craps shoot.  When Mrs HM and I lived in the City we only had one car and it was a small car at that.  When trying to find parking there was a rule:

3 blocks 6 times or 6 blocks 3 times.

This meant that if you went around the 3 nearest blocks in all directions 6 times you were not going to find a spot and should just find a shady spot maybe no one would see you.  But you had to be careful.  Handicap spots and the little ramps in the sidewalks were big tickets and I would never block a plug (hydrant).  Parking in a driveway or blocking a garage not your own was a guaranteed tow, so sneaking into a half spot was generally attempted, sometimes with success, other times that little white envelope would be waiting for you in the morning.

Unless of course you forgot which day of the week street cleaning was.  Then you’ve got another ticket for that too.

The Department of Parking and Traffic wanders the City in little 3 wheeled bikes and are almost like locusts swarming through the neighborhoods looking for places to earn revenue.  It’s a thankless job and when I see their little trucks parked on a plug and they’re no where in sight I call them in as illegally parked.

But I’ve gotten a bit off topic.

Point is, when you would be sitting at a sidewalk cafe and see a DPT bike go by, you suddenly sprang up and sprinted to the clearly expired meter and gave it another 25 cents for another 4 minutes without a $65 ticket.

But since 2008 the DPT officers aren’t looking around as often.

Listen to KRON 4′s Gabe Slate and Stanley Roberts Team up to look at how transit buses are issuing parking tickets just by driving down the street.

[yframe url='http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=u3S2MVQW_qs']

Installed on select Municipal Transportation Buses (MUNI) are cameras that capture images of cars along the bus’s route.  Those videos are then screened by a DPT officer and offending vehicles are sent tickets in the mail.

Unlike static red light cameras, they are able to see if a vehicle is moving, blocking traffic, occupied etc.  However, Happy is not a fan.

Reason being that buses are buses and parking enforcement is parking enforcement.  In addition, I seriously doubt the MUNI drivers are being cited for all their traffic violations, including blocking multiple lanes, stopping blocking intersections, illegal turns etc.  Or perhaps the drivers are safer now that the cameras are installed?

Either way, the City sees some value to the service since over the next 15 months cameras will be installed on all 819 buses.  At a cost of $800,000 in a City facing cuts in Fire, Police, EMS, library, even MUNI is hard to justify.  But in 2010 they recovered almost 1/4 of that cost on only 30 buses.

You do the math.

Some will scream “Big Brother!” and I see that argument and raise you a “it’s breaking posted laws.”

I only hope that the trucks that double park 2 and 3 wide directly next to a clearly identified loading zone get fined as much as the drivers who don’t notice the 3 feet tall letters on the street “TAXI ONLY.”

Perhaps MC could speak to the validity of mounting a camera on the ambulances to capture traffic violations?  I think we could up that 2102 citations in a year in just a few months the way folks seem to go insane around an ambulance.

Do you think this program is a good idea?  Think it goes too far?

Pass your passwords forward please

At last year’s How to Become a Firefighter Workshop here in Northern (some will argue Central, long story) California, I presented on technology in the job hunt, focusing specifically on the pitfalls of social media.  It is a fantastic all day seminar held at the Las Positas Fire College and includes lunch cooked by the students.  The cost of the seminar? $12. Including lunch and a chance to speak to the people hiring you one on one, let them preview your resume etc.  Where was this when I was getting hired?

The seminar attracts Battalion Chiefs, Division Chiefs, Officers from a number of large metropolitan departments and someone you know who writes a blog.  Our pals Judon Cherry, Chris Eldridge, Sam Bradley and Thaddeus Setla helped film the video for the program and this year Judon and the Dridge were there again.  Oh, and I have nothing to do with the kick ass indexed screen shot BTW.  have a look:

[yframe url='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLltS4TQfIE']

The attendees had some great questions about facebook, twitter, email a whole host of issues, but one comment from the audience stood out and has caught traction recently.

In my presentation I mention that some employers are asking that you friend their HR director on facebook prior to the interview.  When I mentioned that the Chiefs you’re speaking with may want to friend you as well, one of them spoke up from the audience,

“I don’t want to be your friend, I want your password.”

The audience was silent.

If you were one of the final applicants being considered for this job, would you give a prospective employer, or anyone for that matter, your facebook password?

It could be considered an invasion of privacy, but I can’t think of a better way to see what someone does when they think no one is watching.  And with the way that an employee can ruin a department’s reputation with the simple click of “share” I think it is reasonable to ask for it.

So this year, when I gave the presentation, we discussed the privacy settings pages and how to eliminate tags in photos perhaps you wish others had not uploaded, comments on posts that maybe you made late at night after drinking studying, or perhaps something rather inflamatory, deragatory, racist, sexist, heterophobic…you get the idea.

It’s actually a good idea for everyone to visit those pages every few months just to check and see what you look like from the inside of social media.  We make comments to one circle of friends the other circles may find offensive, but is any of that going to be considered immature, dishonest or a misrepresentation of who we really are?  It matters greatly if the three key traits an emploer is looking for are maturity, honesty and trust.

What do you think?

If you got called up for your dream job in the fire service and they asked for your password, what would you do?