Happy FDIC!

I have arrived in Indianapolis for FDIC. After arriving late I got a text from pal of the blog Steve Whitehead from the EMT Spot.   In the sea of blue workshirts, FD T-shirts and hats was Steve and his cadre of friends. We talked as if we were all probies back in the day, instantly comfortable with stories, fishing tales and respectful disagreements on the quality of beer available at each establishment visited.

This is the side effect of FDIC that for too many has become the draw: Bars downtown overflowing with firefighters, scantly clad bar maidens and plenty of drinks.

Luckily for me, the nerd, our conversations went from training requirements, to wooden ladders to standardizing expectations on the fireground.

Eventually, and not long into the evening, Steve and I got that awkward question: “How did you guys meet?”

Our answer was quick and brought a laugh to us and a stare to them.

“Oh, we met on the internet.”

TODAY’S SCHEDULE:

1030
FDNY Deputy Chief Frank Viscuso’s class on his book Step Up and Lead. I hope to learn more about Fire Service Leadership traits (a theme you’ll see me chasing a lot this week). I chose this class based not only on the topic, but when the description mentioned “…elevate their ability to lead themselves and others.”

1530
Friend of the blog Bob Atlas from Fire Alumni fame is presenting 11 Essentials of the Company Officer. Not only is it a great topic I hope to learn from but I’ll go and support my friend by laughing at his jokes and offering a familiar smile.

I’ve got the 1330 slot open for now, debating some technical suppression stuff to break up all this leadership training.

Hope to see you here!

-Justin

PS, in case you somehow blinked…I’m presenting Friday.

FDIC image

An Unexpected Compliment

While walking through the kitchen to the comm room to talk to a co-worker, I walked past, and wished a good afternoon to, one of my co-workers.

She stopped me and said, “I have never seen you move without purpose.  You always have someplace to be and you’re going there like it matters.”

 

Possibly the best compliment I’ve gotten in a long time.

A Comment on Typical Idiot EMS Managers by Burned Out Medic.

Burned Out Medic had a post up recently I thought I commented on, but apparently you have to hit ‘submit.’  Who knew?

The post is in reference to a Call the Cops story about an ambulance crew being reprimanded for going 90 MPH even though the vehicles govern out at 70.

Have a read and come back for my comments.

Well let me start by saying I agree 100% and that I’m going to have to disagree 100%.  Typical EMS Manager, right?

 

The trouble with the situation mentioned in the Call the Cops story is that there are no facts.  There does not appear to be any investigation policy or framework, nor is there any documentation confirming the speed of the vehicle, the exact location, time of day, etc.

Most field crews believe EMS Managers are sitting in the office hoping beyond hope that someone calls in a complaint so we can puff up our chests and assert the hair’s width of authority we have.

Let me confirm that that is not the case at all.  In between phone calls from hospitals, regulators, our own managers, chart reading, report filing and other mundane tasks involved with making sure you can still practice, citizen complaints are taken very seriously.

I used to get weekly calls from a fellow who swore up one side and down the other that a crew raped him*.  Same crew, every week. Seriously.  For over a year we were on casual conversation terms each time he called.  Heck one week he didn’t call and I was actually worried.  But the first time he called it was taken very, very seriously.

The conversation was recorded, run data was pulled, AVL signals gathered and only after confirming details from the caller was I able to conclude his complaint to be without merit.

The crew accused wasn’t even working that night but had transported this individual a number of times.  That same crew had recently been accused of other things by other members of the public and medical system.  Each time he called I’d pull the AVL map as we spoke to confirm the crew in question was in the clear.

You see my friends, complaints do not happen in a vacuum.  They are most often the result of someone getting a bill for service or just plain not liking EMS in general.

The example given by Call the Cops that Burned-Out references is hilarious because it can be easily disputed:

  • Obtain complaint in writing or verbally recorded.
  • Pull the unit history for the ambulance in question.
  • Pull AVL data for location.
  • Access maintenance data to ensure governing device installed and properly working.
  • Access previous violations for pattern behavior.

That’ll take maybe an hour.  The thing most field crews don’t realize is that good people can still do bad things.  If you’re a 5 star crew and get a complaint I handle it the same as a complaint about the crew that was in my office yesterday for what ever other frivolous thing the rumor mill says they were in for.

The tough call comes when the AVL data shows the unit traveling on the roadway in question, at the time in question, at the speed limit, but 3 hours earlier data show the vehicle traveling above the speed of the governor.

Now what do you do?  The crew has been proven to not be guilty of the accused offense, yet we now have data that show their defense is faulty.

It’s easy to sit in the rig and gossip about how the managers are out to get you after what happened to so-and-so but just remember it’s a lot of work to get you in trouble, and you know how we pencil pushing EMS Managers hate work.

If your managers are so bad at what they do, promote.  Nothing in EMS is easy, even sitting in a little room with a tie on reading charts and going to meetings.  The ultimate answer to bad leadership is to become a leader yourself.  Show me you can do it better than they can and your service will be the better for it and, as a result, your patients will have a better experience, which is all that matters in the end.

 

EDIT – *Forgot to mention, not the real reason he called, but just as unusual and hard to believe.

Official Fire Service Ice Cream Rule

To finally dispel the myths, rumors and falsehoods regarding the Fire Service Ice Cream Rule (AKA Steaks, Cigars, etc) I offer the following definitive ruling on the matter:

Official Fire Service Ice Cream Rule:

1.  Purpose

To establish when a Member of a Company owes Ice Cream to the other members of said company.

2.  Scope

This rule applies to all Fire Service personnel, both paid, paid call and volunteer regardless of rank, station or assignment.

3.  Definitions

Company – A unit or similar single resource.  This can be defined as an Engine Company, Station House or Volunteer Post.

Member – Any person in official capacity at the time of the incident in question.

Ice Cream – While an abomination in the eyes of the Lord your God, something with a crap load of ingredients.

4.  Enough with the bullet points!  Onto the rule!

Ice Cream is owed only if a member of a company is portrayed in the media, be it television, print, online or otherwise (social media not affiliated with a media outlet excluded (see rule 8))  portrays the member in activities not associated with the assignment they are recorded at.  Being filmed fighting fire, cutting a car, rendering aid or performing regular assigned tasks on the scene of an emergency response DOES NOT entitle the members of the company to ice cream from the member involved. Also, for rules on double parenthesis, see rule 9.

5.  Who gets Ice Cream

Only other Members of the offending Member’s Company are required to be appeased with the cold Ice Cream goodness.  Depending on Agency or Department, this may include all units assigned to a house or all shifts on that unit.  It DOES NOT apply to other Companies, units, houses or personnel who wander in to mention being “owed” Ice Cream.

6.  Who doesn’t get Ice Cream

Officers above the rank of front line supervisor (Lieutenant/Captain/Sergeant) unless they were at the scene and may have to answer to the activities of the member caught not performing duties relevant to the scene in question.  All other houses, members and companies not assigned to the offending Member’s HOME Company.

7.  Oh yeah, that reminds me, HOME Company

Ice Cream is only owed to a Member’s HOME Company, not the Company where they were assigned when said incident took place.

8.  Social Media not involving media outlet

That doesn’t get Ice Cream but instead a pat on the head for the person trying, because that wreaks of desperation.

9.  Multiple Parenthesis

Nah, looks weird…or like math, which is WAY worse.

 

You got WHAT stuck in a bowling ball?

In my memoirs of EMS (Working title – My Life in CQI: Kill me now, just document it properly) some calls will stand above all others.  This, sadly, is not one of mine, but from a friend overseas.

No, not Mark.

I got an email about a curious rescue his agency was called to and was wondering what I would have done.

So, here is the scenario:

 

A 19 year old male has gotten his finger stuck in a bowling ball.  He somehow wedged it in there so far, it up against the webbing of his hand with very little wiggle room.  Rotating the ball is out of the question as he seems to have the finger next to it wedged in almost just as bad.

25 minutes into the call you’ve tried gel, ice, lubricants of questionable origin (who carries that stuff into a bowling alley?) and brute force.  Prayer is taking place and all options seem exhausted when the decision is made to simply move him, and the 16 pound bowling ball, to the hospital.  What will they do there?  Dunno.

 

What would you do?

A quiet weekend in the City

Some boats in the bay…

America’s World Cup

More boats…
Fleet Week

Air traffic ticks up a smidge…

Blue Angels

Music…

Hardly Strictly Bluegrass

A bit of sport…
Cincinatti Reds at SF Giants MLB Playoff Game

Buffalo Bills at SF 49ers NFL Game

 

Should only triple to population for a few days, all 33,000+ hotel rooms are booked, and I wish my weekend cars luck.

Out of Left Field

Sometimes we forget who we’re up against.

Sometimes the system is indeed rigged against us from the start.

But how can you win if the other party refuses to even play the game?

 

The term “blind sided” was used in a meeting today, much to my surprise.  You could even go so far as to say that I was blind sided by this blind side.

It was a jolt of reality back into my EMS 2.0 world that not all of our enemies lie within.  Some are just skirting along the outside of EMS, providing valuable services, only to pounce on ideas they find threatening.

Only problem is, I don’t see it that way, not sure I ever will.

I’ve had almost a year to figure out this whole politics thing and I still just don’t get it.  I don’t care who had the idea, or who gets credit, I need some things to just happen.

In my role, very few decisions are actually within my control.  I do research and pass the info along.  If it gets rejected, I research more.  I’ve had my preconceptions busted more than a few times, comes with the territory.  But there is this perception that others see my actions as more for me than the system.

I just don’t get it.

 

Some things come from out of left field, but that’s all based on the assumption that what we’re expecting was in left field to begin with.  My surprise came from the bleachers behind left field, caught my on the jaw and knocked me to the floor, blinking, wondering what just happened.  I had a ceiling do that to me once.  Once.

 

I’d love to say “never again!” but when you don’t know what to expect, how can you prepare?

Special Call Mobile Surgery 1, Mobile Surgery 2, EMS Surgeon 1…

A nice resource to have if your system is innundated by, oh I don’t know, the shaking of the earth until everything falls down.  Especially in a City with water on 3 sides and only 4 trauma bays…total.

 

[yframe url=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lc707gqtzcM&feature=fvwrel’]

 

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Please Albert, not in mixed company

Sometimes we spend a few days with like minded folks and forget that we speak differently when around them.  We speak candidly about our jobs, our frustrations and our opinions of others not like us.

 

When waiting with a large crowd for the train at the airport it is not advisable to have a raucous conversation about people who commit suicide by jumping off of buildings.  You compared highest falls, genders, dispersal of remains, even splatter patterns.  The disgusted looks you were getting from those around you went unnoticed by you but I’m sure they took note of your ambulance companies which were prominently displayed on your shirts.  I tried to get your attention to distract you, but when you made the Humpty Dumpty joke, I decided to pretend I was offended too.  It wasn’t hard at all.