You Make the Call – The Bar – What Happened

I was taken aback by this guy at the bar in a T-Shirt with a 8″ EMT on the back and giant star of life.  Add to that the stethoscope around his neck and I was just confused.

My fire and PD buddies were making jokes while I was trying to make the decision whether or not to approach him.

I could start the conversation by asking if he really was an EMT, which I’m sure he is hoping someone will ask, hence the shirt, but it was really the combination of the pants, shirt and especially stethoscope that had me thinking this person is clearly not “one of us,” US being the profession.

He managed to wander over to a table of ladies with his friend who said, “Make room for my EMT buddy,” at which point I had to cover a laugh.

No matter what I said or how I approached the situation, this was not the time or the place to address his lack of professionalism.

He was not in a uniform, but as far as the public knows, he was.  He was not doing anything “wrong,” just not the best thing at that moment.

Mark can tell you that when coming home from riding with him and purchasing an adult beverage at the store, I turned my jacket inside out.  I looked odd, but even in another country I didn’t want to let folks know about that association.

So in the end, I let it go, mainly because I am convinced he would not have understood.

My buddy then, after we left, asked why I didn’t give him a Happy Medic card, then blog about it.

Also not “wrong” but maybe not the best way to approach it.  So in the end, I only did one of the two.

If you said stay out of it, you made my call.

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17 thoughts on “You Make the Call – The Bar – What Happened”

  1. Well shoot, I was going to guess that you had seen a male dancer winding down post job; bachlorette parties are a lot less discriminating when it comes to uniforms than us fire-rescue folks!

  2. whe can all learn abouth it and yes he may have not be a EMT and i do think it is one of the many way to deal with it . isent it why whe are wath whe are having multiple solution to one problem , keep the good work justin (happy)

  3. whe can all learn abouth it and yes he may have not be a EMT and i do think it is one of the many way to deal with it . isent it why whe are wath whe are having multiple solution to one problem , keep the good work justin (happy)

    1. if yr an emt learn how to spell, I wound not like someone who cannot spell easy kindergarten words coming to help me

      1. really nice to read such i good comment you are totally correct i m making a couple of spelling mistake but since my primary language is french i do consider that i m not that bad ! but if you prefer to read me in french i would gladly correct your spelling , until that day i will continue to try to make less mistake and again tanks

  4. I’d have given him your card. He must be at least a little interested in EMS; otherwise, why the fancy dress?

    Then he could have read just what you (and most of us) think of idiots like that!

    Obviously you couldn’t tackle him there and then, unless you like the taste of your own blood (or worse).

    As a Community First Responder (volunteer) in the UK, I sometimes have a problem with what I’m wearing. I respond in civillian clothing with just a hi-viz vest. If I’m working in the garden or it’s a very hot day, I may not be the epitome of sartorial elegance! (See http://ambulanceamateur.wordpress.com/2010/07/27/wheelchair-wreck/)

    However, when I’m on-call, I generally spend 90-95% of my time getting on with what I’m doing and only 5-10% of it as an active Responder. I have (usually) to dress for the majority of the time – we do not usually respond in any kind of uniform. In fact, it’s debatable as to whether there is one for us! (There are several; which do I wear? Few are great and the whole point of CFRs is that we get on with what we’d otherwise be doing, so we need to dress for that.

    It would be inadvisable to take a shower when on call!

    However, your idiot was pretending to be a “uniformed” member of the EMS.

  5. I’d have given him your card. He must be at least a little interested in EMS; otherwise, why the fancy dress?

    Then he could have read just what you (and most of us) think of idiots like that!

    Obviously you couldn’t tackle him there and then, unless you like the taste of your own blood (or worse).

    As a Community First Responder (volunteer) in the UK, I sometimes have a problem with what I’m wearing. I respond in civillian clothing with just a hi-viz vest. If I’m working in the garden or it’s a very hot day, I may not be the epitome of sartorial elegance! (See http://ambulanceamateur.wordpress.com/2010/07/27/wheelchair-wreck/)

    However, when I’m on-call, I generally spend 90-95% of my time getting on with what I’m doing and only 5-10% of it as an active Responder. I have (usually) to dress for the majority of the time – we do not usually respond in any kind of uniform. In fact, it’s debatable as to whether there is one for us! (There are several; which do I wear? Few are great and the whole point of CFRs is that we get on with what we’d otherwise be doing, so we need to dress for that.

    It would be inadvisable to take a shower when on call!

    However, your idiot was pretending to be a “uniformed” member of the EMS.

  6. if yr an emt learn how to spell, I wound not like someone who cannot spell easy kindergarten words coming to help me

  7. Great story, only problem is i’m an older paramedic who actually uses his stethoscope and yes I get a lot of flack for wearing it round my neck. But I paid to much money not to use it. I would have poked him in the eye and told him to fix it himself if he was a medic.

  8. Great story, only problem is i’m an older paramedic who actually uses his stethoscope and yes I get a lot of flack for wearing it round my neck. But I paid to much money not to use it. I would have poked him in the eye and told him to fix it himself if he was a medic.

  9. I don’t know why one of you didn’t fake an attack on the spot! Sadly, I see many real life EMTs who even out of town to conferences wouldn’t leave their hotel w/o the whole ambulance hanging from their belt and ears draped around their necks.

  10. I don’t know why one of you didn’t fake an attack on the spot! Sadly, I see many real life EMTs who even out of town to conferences wouldn’t leave their hotel w/o the whole ambulance hanging from their belt and ears draped around their necks.

  11. really nice to read such i good comment you are totally correct i m making a couple of spelling mistake but since my primary language is french i do consider that i m not that bad ! but if you prefer to read me in french i would gladly correct your spelling , until that day i will continue to try to make less mistake and again tanks

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