I’ll Make the Call

I’ve decided to try to improve myself and my career track by putting in for the Paramedic Supervisor position at my agency.

In past examinations, information gathered from outside the agency has not proven very helpful in the specifics of the exams, but I’m all for increasing critical thinking skills, as you know.

So I am going to be calling on my most valued resource, you the reader, to help me do just that.

Over the next month, posting here will nearly grind to a halt with so much happening for Chronicles in Denver and Indianapolis, as I have mentioned, but the exam packet will be out soon and I want to study it as much as I can.

And since I know I’ll be finding myself in front of this laptop more often than I should, give me something I need to see.

In the next 3 weeks I’m asking my friends in EMS, especially those of you who serve as supervisors, or have filled that role in the past, to send in problems, situations or questions for me to ponder or consider.  Include your name, or what you want to be called and some basics about your system.  And if you are not a supervisor, but have a situation you think could help, please send it along as well.

As they arrive in the inbox at thehappymedic@gmail.com, I’ll put them up.

That way I can work on critical thinking skills and the rest of you have a month long You Make the Call right along with me.

Whether I comment or not will depend on my free time and whether my answer to your situation will confuse my answer to my agency’s specific requirements for the test.

In a recent suppression promotional exam, agency specifics trumped nationwide practices, so I have to be careful about answering.

After the exam, regular posting should return, but my eldest asked me this morning,

“Daddy, do you have to go see Mark tomorrow or can Happy go instead?”

So get those questions in text and send them over, you are all my study buddies now, like it or not.  I have access to your experience and I plan to take full advantage of it.

Agree? Disagree? Have something to add? Why not leave a comment or subscribe to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader?

24 thoughts on “I’ll Make the Call”

  1. You will do an amazing job once you get those brass bars. GOOD LUCK, but remember once you put on those brass bars you are held at a different standard then everyone else. Those brass bars are a lot of responsibililty, but I know you are up to the task.

  2. Curious- what’s after Supervisor? Similar schedule to your current? How big of a territory/number of minio…. I mean number responsible for?

    1. CB, we currently run a single Paramedic Supervisor unit in 3 districts who cover between 750,000 and almost 2 million between them depending on the time and day of the week.
      The supervisors respond to major incidents, most pediatric calls (not sure why) and all reports of airway obstruction or CPR in progress.
      We also have persons of this rank in our continuing education section as well as in the communications division supervising the dispatch of EMS in the City.
      The 4th Captain unit was deactivated and moved to supervise our fleet of dynamic 10 hour ambulances from a central yard, the one you see in the CoEMS episode.
      They used to rotate the Captains throug hthe different positions, but as of late I see the same faces in the same places.
      Change of hours, most likely, from 24s to 10s if I get the radio or teaching spot, but I long for that field spot.

      First things first though, do well on the exam!

      1. I see. I wasn’t sure if each Sup had a set number of ambulances to oversee, but if it’s geographic and whoever’s there at the time s/he covers that makes sense too.

        Good luck! I’ll try to come up with something for you to chew on for studying.

  3. You will do an amazing job once you get those brass bars. GOOD LUCK, but remember once you put on those brass bars you are held at a different standard then everyone else. Those brass bars are a lot of responsibililty, but I know you are up to the task.

  4. Curious- what's after Supervisor? Similar schedule to your current? How big of a territory/number of minio…. I mean number responsible for?

  5. CB, we currently run a single Paramedic Supervisor unit in 3 districts who cover between 750,000 and almost 2 million between them depending on the time and day of the week.
    The supervisors respond to major incidents, most pediatric calls (not sure why) and all reports of airway obstruction or CPR in progress.
    We also have persons of this rank in our continuing education section as well as in the communications division supervising the dispatch of EMS in the City.
    The 4th Captain unit was deactivated and moved to supervise our fleet of dynamic 10 hour ambulances from a central yard, the one you see in the CoEMS episode.
    They used to rotate the Captains throug hthe different positions, but as of late I see the same faces in the same places.
    Change of hours, most likely, from 24s to 10s if I get the radio or teaching spot, but I long for that field spot.

    First things first though, do well on the exam!

  6. I see. I wasn't sure if each Sup had a set number of ambulances to oversee, but if it's geographic and whoever's there at the time s/he covers that makes sense too.

    Good luck! I'll try to come up with something for you to chew on for studying.

  7. As a former supervisor, these things might seem condescending to you, I hope not. (just reminders)…..know policy inside and out…………..remember where you came from…….since you desire the field spot, would you decline the teaching spot? if or if not show equal interest they remember how we react in interviews. Supervisor skills as you know or are finding out require you to wear many hats, and knowing which one to have on at any given time is the most challenging to manage your team. As you know, each person/subordinate responds to different stimulation and direction. Ask your team how they customarily do things and why if you have questions? then determine if that fits within your supervisory style. If it aint broke don’t fix it is a good ole phrase, however if things can be improved…….lead the way with communication and examples first. Change is potentially traumatizing for you and subordinates. Open and honest dialogue. How is the agency currently run?, know the structure, chain of command, goals, and how you can fit or improve if awarded the promotion.

  8. you suspect an employee is more reserved than usual, seems to be more tired and gets agitated more easily. What is your differential for possible problems/concerns? What would you consider doing? What if anything do you need to immediatley do/say? What are your (agency), repercussions/consequences if you do/say or don’t do/say something?

  9. As a former supervisor, these things might seem condescending to you, I hope not. (just reminders)…..know policy inside and out…………..remember where you came from…….since you desire the field spot, would you decline the teaching spot? if or if not show equal interest they remember how we react in interviews. Supervisor skills as you know or are finding out require you to wear many hats, and knowing which one to have on at any given time is the most challenging to manage your team. As you know, each person/subordinate responds to different stimulation and direction. Ask your team how they customarily do things and why if you have questions? then determine if that fits within your supervisory style. If it aint broke don't fix it is a good ole phrase, however if things can be improved…….lead the way with communication and examples first. Change is potentially traumatizing for you and subordinates. Open and honest dialogue. How is the agency currently run?, know the structure, chain of command, goals, and how you can fit or improve if awarded the promotion.

  10. you suspect an employee is more reserved than usual, seems to be more tired and gets agitated more easily. What is your differential for possible problems/concerns? What would you consider doing? What if anything do you need to immediatley do/say? What are your (agency), repercussions/consequences if you do/say or don't do/say something?

  11. As a former supervisor, these things might seem condescending to you, I hope not. (just reminders)…..know policy inside and out…………..remember where you came from…….since you desire the field spot, would you decline the teaching spot? if or if not show equal interest they remember how we react in interviews. Supervisor skills as you know or are finding out require you to wear many hats, and knowing which one to have on at any given time is the most challenging to manage your team. As you know, each person/subordinate responds to different stimulation and direction. Ask your team how they customarily do things and why if you have questions? then determine if that fits within your supervisory style. If it aint broke don't fix it is a good ole phrase, however if things can be improved…….lead the way with communication and examples first. Change is potentially traumatizing for you and subordinates. Open and honest dialogue. How is the agency currently run?, know the structure, chain of command, goals, and how you can fit or improve if awarded the promotion.

  12. you suspect an employee is more reserved than usual, seems to be more tired and gets agitated more easily. What is your differential for possible problems/concerns? What would you consider doing? What if anything do you need to immediatley do/say? What are your (agency), repercussions/consequences if you do/say or don't do/say something?

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