Letters in the files are flying today

It’s been awhile since I had to fire up the typewriter and find carbon paper for these letters, but something very close to home has happened and we need to nip this all in the bud.

First letter in the file-

A Letter in the FileJason Brown, Colleton County Firefighter Paramedic, was released from duty last week after posting a cartoon video to his facebook page which featured harsh language and an exchange between a firefighter character and a doctor character.  We all remember Fireman Mike’s suggestions about when to call 911, and the language in that video wasn’t PG, but it lacked the confrontation shown in Jason’s video.  In a perfect world we would all watch this cartoon and laugh because I have had a similar conversation 100s of times in clinics and medical offices wondering just where these folks went to medical school.

But the end of the video is the only part I have an issue with – “We’re going to pretend this conversation never happened…” this implies that the fireman cartoon in the video is going to ignore the complaint and leave.  THAT is the reason this letter is going in your file, for a questionable ending to a cartoon video on the internet.

Second letter should not need to be written, but your knee jerked so hard so fast it went right up and kicked you in the face.

A Letter in the FileColleton County Fire-Rescue Director Barry McRoy.  In your termination letter to FF/PM Brown you mention “This video has created an embarrassing situation for this department, our public image and the cooperative relationship we enjoy with Colleton Medical Center. It reflects poorly on you and Colleton County.”

No, Sir, you and your Department made this an embarrassing situation for the department.  Ask Brown to remove the video and make a training film if so inclined to make movies keeps this in house and solves all the problems.

I can only assume your fear of the rest of the country finding out the working relationships your service might really have has scared you into firing anyone who tries to express themselves.

Was it the video, the characters or the fact the world saw it on his facebook page?  I can only assume he is like me on facebook, friends, family and coworkers following along.  When he posts the video maybe 100-200 people see it, maybe half that amount watch it.  That is how social media works. It isn’t put up on every single fire and EMS website for all to see…

…until you fired him for it.  You took an easily fixable in house “choice of words” situation and exploded it into a National example of a public safety agency afraid of social media.  Because of the way you handled this situation I and now my readers are reading about Colleton, whereas last week I did not even know the agency existed.

In my book, you Sir, are the one who should be fired for creating “…an embarrassing situation for this department, our public image and the cooperative relationship we enjoy with Colleton Medical Center. It reflects poorly on … Colleton County.”  Sound familiar?

Both of you need to sit down and TALK about this, face to face.  If the offended Doctor who likely asked you to fire Brown wants to join in, all the better.  Have a talk about the proper way to use social media to move the agency, EMS and medicine forward.

This is a sticky spot to be in for sure.  I’m sure if you look hard enough into my musings there is a reason Colleton would fire me too, and every other EMS and Fire blogger.

But think of it this way:

What if Brown had drawn his video cartoon and had it published in a national EMS magazine instead?  Perhaps a single panel cartoon showing a Paramedic and an MD disagreeing in an entertaining manner for all to enjoy?

Would that be OK?

Should Brown be fired?  I say no.  Reprimanded…perhaps, spoken to for sure, but firing him first thing shows fear.

That is not all.

Editor’s note: No the link to the video is not broken, it is not here.  Best part of all this is that you can find it all over the internet now, I don’t need to link to it here.

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23 thoughts on “Letters in the files are flying today”

  1. Unfortunately this is a classic example of complete over the top knee jerk reactions by senior management. Often these take a situation where they might have valid grounds for slight objections, remove all common sense, completely over-react, cause a media storm and some poor sod loses their job when words of advice would have produced a much better result. And often these managers manage to score a massive own goal due to their reaction…

    I think this is likely one of the biggest barriers to EMS2.0. Until professionals feel they can post their opinion without fear of over the top reactions from their managers then they will likely not participate at all. If it comes to a choice between earning a salary or having a blog then most professionals with families to support will pick the salary!

    That is not to say that people shouldn't be accountable for what they write. However as TheHappyMedic states above it's all about sensible and measured reactions instead of taking advice from the Stalinist book of management… (Deny that you every have any problems, sack anyone who speaks against you)

  2. Unfortunately this is a classic example of complete over the top knee jerk reactions by senior management. Often these take a situation where they might have valid grounds for slight objections, remove all common sense, completely over-react, cause a media storm and some poor sod loses their job when words of advice would have produced a much better result. And often these managers manage to score a massive own goal due to their reaction…

    I think this is likely one of the biggest barriers to EMS2.0. Until professionals feel they can post their opinion without fear of over the top reactions from their managers then they will likely not participate at all. If it comes to a choice between earning a salary or having a blog then most professionals with families to support will pick the salary!

    That is not to say that people shouldn’t be accountable for what they write. However as TheHappyMedic states above it’s all about sensible and measured reactions instead of taking advice from the Stalinist book of management… (Deny that you every have any problems, sack anyone who speaks against you)

  3. Unfortunately this is a classic example of complete over the top knee jerk reactions by senior management. Often these take a situation where they might have valid grounds for slight objections, remove all common sense, completely over-react, cause a media storm and some poor sod loses their job when words of advice would have produced a much better result. And often these managers manage to score a massive own goal due to their reaction…

    I think this is likely one of the biggest barriers to EMS2.0. Until professionals feel they can post their opinion without fear of over the top reactions from their managers then they will likely not participate at all. If it comes to a choice between earning a salary or having a blog then most professionals with families to support will pick the salary!

    That is not to say that people shouldn't be accountable for what they write. However as TheHappyMedic states above it's all about sensible and measured reactions instead of taking advice from the Stalinist book of management… (Deny that you every have any problems, sack anyone who speaks against you)

  4. Brave reaction Justin. Thank you for representing all of us in a fair and proper manner. I couldn’t agree more with what you have said. By firing this medic, Colleton County is only creating fear in the medics who blog, fear in the general public (they will now think we’re all irresponsible and unprofessional, whereas before, they wouldn’t have ever known of it) and fear in other EMS systems to feel like they too should be acting.

    Brown’s video was harsh, but has no reflection on his paramedical skill level, his working professionalism or the Colleton EMS service. So why fire him indeed?

  5. Brave reaction Justin. Thank you for representing all of us in a fair and proper manner. I couldn't agree more with what you have said. By firing this medic, Colleton County is only creating fear in the medics who blog, fear in the general public (they will now think we're all irresponsible and unprofessional, whereas before, they wouldn't have ever known of it) and fear in other EMS systems to feel like they too should be acting.

    Brown's video was harsh, but has no reflection on his paramedical skill level, his working professionalism or the Colleton EMS service. So why fire him indeed?

  6. Bravo, Justin. As an aside, one more reason why to be in the IAFF. Union representation makes management think twice before firing without forethought or due process

  7. Bravo, Justin. As an aside, one more reason why to be in the IAFF. Union representation makes management think twice before firing without forethought or due process

  8. I was such a Happy Medic myself when I saw that Happy had written about this issue. Phew! Now I don’t have to be the first!

    Colleton County EMS – and yes I’m using that so Google will pick up these keywords – has created a storm of negative PR for themselves. Just as Happy said, they did it to themselves quite independently of anything that their medic did. So he made a video to blow off some steam. So he had some colorful language in it and maybe it was in poor taste as well… that’s probably all true. I don’t know the guy, so I can’t say that I’ll hang my hat on his record… but what Colleton County EMS did in their reaction to the video is way beyond a reasonable reaction to it. It’s just plain wrong.

    My guess is that this guy had some steam to blow off, and maybe he isn’t the most professional medic out there. The language in the video tipped me off to that. Perhaps he and I wouldn’t see eye-to-eye on every issue and perhaps I’d have to school him on a few things. However, he has the right to express his First Amendment rights. We all do and while employers have the right to censor things that will damage their own reputation, this wasn’t that. The message brought forth in the video didn’t reference the employer, the medical center, or really anyone in particular. The doctor he mentioned, “Dr. Ward” wasn’t defamed in any way, nor was any “Dr. Ward” personally identified. I personally know a handful of “Dr. Wards” and I didn’t imagine that it was any one of them.

    This case makes a horrible precedent and the ruling should not be allowed to stand. Paramedics and EMTs need to be able to express opinions that their employers may not agree with. It’s our obligation to bring up issues that affect our profession and our service to the public. It’s not just our First Amendment right, it’s our professional obligation. Remember folks, corruption can only exist in the dark. Once light is shown upon it, it tends to dry up and go away. I’m not accusing Colleton County EMS of any corruption… nor am I saying that the Administrators of Colleton County are corrupt… I’m just saying that I believe they acted irresponsibly at best.

    To take this a step forward, if the medic truly was trying to bring a problem to the attention of the public independent of his management chain, that is his RIGHT and his OBLIGATION as a public servant. Administrators hate whistleblowers for a reason and usually that reason is because it exposes something they don’t want exposed. To squash that whistleblower through heavy-handed termination is to try and rule their employees through fear. I gotta tell you, that’s not a long-lasting management style.

    Colleton County: If you want to come through this without your entire operation being scrutinized, you better come out somewhere and respond to this. You may be in the right for reasons we don’t know, but you better come out and tell us what those are. I’m not letting this go.

    Remember this quote, always. “All it takes for Evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing”.

  9. I was such a Happy Medic myself when I saw that Happy had written about this issue. Phew! Now I don't have to be the first!

    Colleton County EMS – and yes I'm using that so Google will pick up these keywords – has created a storm of negative PR for themselves. Just as Happy said, they did it to themselves quite independently of anything that their medic did. So he made a video to blow off some steam. So he had some colorful language in it and maybe it was in poor taste as well… that's probably all true. I don't know the guy, so I can't say that I'll hang my hat on his record… but what Colleton County EMS did in their reaction to the video is way beyond a reasonable reaction to it. It's just plain wrong.

    My guess is that this guy had some steam to blow off, and maybe he isn't the most professional medic out there. The language in the video tipped me off to that. Perhaps he and I wouldn't see eye-to-eye on every issue and perhaps I'd have to school him on a few things. However, he has the right to express his First Amendment rights. We all do and while employers have the right to censor things that will damage their own reputation, this wasn't that. The message brought forth in the video didn't reference the employer, the medical center, or really anyone in particular. The doctor he mentioned, “Dr. Ward” wasn't defamed in any way, nor was any “Dr. Ward” personally identified. I personally know a handful of “Dr. Wards” and I didn't imagine that it was any one of them.

    This case makes a horrible precedent and the ruling should not be allowed to stand. Paramedics and EMTs need to be able to express opinions that their employers may not agree with. It's our obligation to bring up issues that affect our profession and our service to the public. It's not just our First Amendment right, it's our professional obligation. Remember folks, corruption can only exist in the dark. Once light is shown upon it, it tends to dry up and go away. I'm not accusing Colleton County EMS of any corruption… nor am I saying that the Administrators of Colleton County are corrupt… I'm just saying that I believe they acted irresponsibly at best.

    To take this a step forward, if the medic truly was trying to bring a problem to the attention of the public independent of his management chain, that is his RIGHT and his OBLIGATION as a public servant. Administrators hate whistleblowers for a reason and usually that reason is because it exposes something they don't want exposed. To squash that whistleblower through heavy-handed termination is to try and rule their employees through fear. I gotta tell you, that's not a long-lasting management style.

    Colleton County: If you want to come through this without your entire operation being scrutinized, you better come out somewhere and respond to this. You may be in the right for reasons we don't know, but you better come out and tell us what those are. I'm not letting this go.

    Remember this quote, always. “All it takes for Evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing”.

  10. I dare say that these types of incidents will become more frequent as more people across the country “man up” and expose the negative side of emergency medicine. There’s nothing dirtier than the family secrets be aired in public for all to see and hear.

    I can’t help but think that there is a touch of us versus them going on as well. After all, who are WE, the low level field providers, to determine what is right and what is wrong with the business practices of multi-million dollar corporations?

    Who are we to criticise the business practices of those who feed us? Why that’s just biting the hands that feed us isn’t it? Surely if we were smart enough to run a corporation or manage a municiple agancy, then we’d be doing just that now wouldn’t we…instead of just stiring up trouble and fighting status quo.

    I have seen first hand how things can change when you start exposing the idiocies of a company or a system to the world. I know they read my blogs locally. I hear the snide remarks around town and I know a cold shoulder when I get one.

    We may all have to become like FF/PM Brown one day…who knows? This could get nasty; but I ready for a legitimate fight.

    Thanks for getting on this HM!

  11. I dare say that these types of incidents will become more frequent as more people across the country “man up” and expose the negative side of emergency medicine. There's nothing dirtier than the family secrets be aired in public for all to see and hear.

    I can't help but think that there is a touch of us versus them going on as well. After all, who are WE, the low level field providers, to determine what is right and what is wrong with the business practices of multi-million dollar corporations?

    Who are we to criticise the business practices of those who feed us? Why that's just biting the hands that feed us isn't it? Surely if we were smart enough to run a corporation or manage a municiple agancy, then we'd be doing just that now wouldn't we…instead of just stiring up trouble and fighting status quo.

    I have seen first hand how things can change when you start exposing the idiocies of a company or a system to the world. I know they read my blogs locally. I hear the snide remarks around town and I know a cold shoulder when I get one.

    We may all have to become like FF/PM Brown one day…who knows? This could get nasty; but I ready for a legitimate fight.

    Thanks for getting on this HM!

  12. While I agree with everything HM wrote (and the majority of the comments) a part of me has to wonder: was this cartoon why the medic was fired OR was it simply the straw that broke the camels back? Something tells me that maybe there is more to the story than we are being told. Now that doesn’t make the firing “right” but could make it a little more understandable.
    As far as “fear of social media” goes, I think we’re seeing a similar reaction to social media in EMS that we saw when the 1st rounds of MilBlogs came around. First they were in the shadows, then they were blocked (for a mix of legitimate and dumb reasons) and now they have embraced social media and are using it as a tool. I expect we shall see more and more of that in EMS/Fire in the near future. There will always be concerns about confidentiality, PR, public perception but overall I expect that the community will self-police and the “offenders” will be quickly, at a minimum, discredited and banished to the dustbin of the interwebs.

  13. While I agree with everything HM wrote (and the majority of the comments) a part of me has to wonder: was this cartoon why the medic was fired OR was it simply the straw that broke the camels back? Something tells me that maybe there is more to the story than we are being told. Now that doesn't make the firing “right” but could make it a little more understandable.
    As far as “fear of social media” goes, I think we're seeing a similar reaction to social media in EMS that we saw when the 1st rounds of MilBlogs came around. First they were in the shadows, then they were blocked (for a mix of legitimate and dumb reasons) and now they have embraced social media and are using it as a tool. I expect we shall see more and more of that in EMS/Fire in the near future. There will always be concerns about confidentiality, PR, public perception but overall I expect that the community will self-police and the “offenders” will be quickly, at a minimum, discredited and banished to the dustbin of the interwebs.

  14. Interesting situation here. I agree that the firing appears to be a knee jerk over reaction to something that was somewhat of a private message, but let’s look at some more of the issues here (Please hold your fire until you read all of my comments.)

    First, the first article I read that reported this story did state that a doctor (if not the specific doctor Brown had a run in with) was named Ward and that there was reason to believe the cartoon was referring to him. If Brown truly did not intend to disparage any particular doctor at the hospital why not pull a name out of the hat that was not connected to the hospital, like “Dr. Brown”? Given the cartoon, it seems as if Brown wanted to tweak someone’s nose.

    Second, although I have seen, and been subject to, situations where management action have far outweighed the alleged basis for disciplinary action, as someone else said, we simply do not know if this was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Although the county is hiding behind the line of “this is a personnel matter and thus is confidential ….” I would think they would let the world know that there were other issues involved in the decision if this was not an isolated incident. But the question remains unanswered.

    Third, people have a basic misunderstanding of what the 1st Amendment allows/protects. While practicing law, I found a case in PA where a worker at a youth facility was denied unemployment benefits because he disobeyed an order from a superior about reporting an abusive situation. The worker was told not to go over the supervisor’s head and talk to members of the board of directors when he was not satisfied with how the supervisor handled an alleged instance of abuse. Without getting into a constitutional law class, let me just say that there are situations in which government agencies can limit, especially employee’s, speech. This is why not all whistle blowers are protected. Certainly if there is a dangerous situation and going through the chain of command has not rectified the situation, it would be appropriate to bring it out in the open. However, if it is a situation where the doctor is a jerk with poor bedside manner, or who refuses to approve orders for the most mundane and simplest inteventions, does that need to go beyond talking with colleagues?

    Fourth, politics and the bottom line will triumph over what is right more often than not. That being the case, if you are on the outside you are not in a position to change anything. Although I agree with the premise that evil will triumph when good people do nothing, doing your job to the best of your ability is one way of fighting the bad things in our system.

    Fifth, I have to take issue with notion that the cartoon would only have been seen by those people directly in Brown’s list of friends. I have come across several of the same type of cartoons, as well as other videos (my favorite being “Someone did not lilke “Trauma” from Youtube) that I have passed on to other people. Once something is on the web – anywhere on the web – it is like a wild fire. There is simply no telling which direction it will take or how far it will spread. BUT, just like a poor decision by senior officers fighting a wildfire can cause the fire to spread further, the actions of Colleton County have certainly ensured that the cartoon will be spread with greater distance than if they had handled more appropriately.

    Sixth, whether you say or do something just to tweak someone’s nose or whether it is done out of a genuine concern about an issue that affects either an individual or the public’s safety, once you make the decision that you can not keep silent, you also have to accept the fact that there may be negative consequences for speaking up. Or for simply doing your job. When I simply did not take orders from a local fire commissioner and walk a patient from an MVC with a severe head injury to my ambulance, I was transferred after the fire commissioner complained. I emphatically agree that there are times when situations exist where, not only as professionals, but as human beings, we need to take a stand and let the chips fall wherever. However, just as the web has brought many positive benefits to our professional lives – such as the ability to communicate throught spaces like this – we have also seen the negative aspects of it, i.e. pictures from calls being posted on the internet with people thereafter losing their jobs. We have to pick and choose where we take stands – especially when those stands can become larger than the underlying message.

    As much as the rebel in me would like srceam about the unfairness and absurdity of the actions of Colleton County, this is more like an instance of non-specific chest pain. I don’t like the way it looks but until there is more information I have to reserve judgement.

  15. Interesting situation here. I agree that the firing appears to be a knee jerk over reaction to something that was somewhat of a private message, but let's look at some more of the issues here (Please hold your fire until you read all of my comments.)

    First, the first article I read that reported this story did state that a doctor (if not the specific doctor Brown had a run in with) was named Ward and that there was reason to believe the cartoon was referring to him. If Brown truly did not intend to disparage any particular doctor at the hospital why not pull a name out of the hat that was not connected to the hospital, like “Dr. Brown”? Given the cartoon, it seems as if Brown wanted to tweak someone's nose.

    Second, although I have seen, and been subject to, situations where management action have far outweighed the alleged basis for disciplinary action, as someone else said, we simply do not know if this was the straw that broke the camel's back. Although the county is hiding behind the line of “this is a personnel matter and thus is confidential ….” I would think they would let the world know that there were other issues involved in the decision if this was not an isolated incident. But the question remains unanswered.

    Third, people have a basic misunderstanding of what the 1st Amendment allows/protects. While practicing law, I found a case in PA where a worker at a youth facility was denied unemployment benefits because he disobeyed an order from a superior about reporting an abusive situation. The worker was told not to go over the supervisor's head and talk to members of the board of directors when he was not satisfied with how the supervisor handled an alleged instance of abuse. Without getting into a constitutional law class, let me just say that there are situations in which government agencies can limit, especially employee's, speech. This is why not all whistle blowers are protected. Certainly if there is a dangerous situation and going through the chain of command has not rectified the situation, it would be appropriate to bring it out in the open. However, if it is a situation where the doctor is a jerk with poor bedside manner, or who refuses to approve orders for the most mundane and simplest inteventions, does that need to go beyond talking with colleagues?

    Fourth, politics and the bottom line will triumph over what is right more often than not. That being the case, if you are on the outside you are not in a position to change anything. Although I agree with the premise that evil will triumph when good people do nothing, doing your job to the best of your ability is one way of fighting the bad things in our system.

    Fifth, I have to take issue with notion that the cartoon would only have been seen by those people directly in Brown's list of friends. I have come across several of the same type of cartoons, as well as other videos (my favorite being “Someone did not lilke “Trauma” from Youtube) that I have passed on to other people. Once something is on the web – anywhere on the web – it is like a wild fire. There is simply no telling which direction it will take or how far it will spread. BUT, just like a poor decision by senior officers fighting a wildfire can cause the fire to spread further, the actions of Colleton County have certainly ensured that the cartoon will be spread with greater distance than if they had handled more appropriately.

    Sixth, whether you say or do something just to tweak someone's nose or whether it is done out of a genuine concern about an issue that affects either an individual or the public's safety, once you make the decision that you can not keep silent, you also have to accept the fact that there may be negative consequences for speaking up. Or for simply doing your job. When I simply did not take orders from a local fire commissioner and walk a patient from an MVC with a severe head injury to my ambulance, I was transferred after the fire commissioner complained. I emphatically agree that there are times when situations exist where, not only as professionals, but as human beings, we need to take a stand and let the chips fall wherever. However, just as the web has brought many positive benefits to our professional lives – such as the ability to communicate throught spaces like this – we have also seen the negative aspects of it, i.e. pictures from calls being posted on the internet with people thereafter losing their jobs. We have to pick and choose where we take stands – especially when those stands can become larger than the underlying message.

    As much as the rebel in me would like srceam about the unfairness and absurdity of the actions of Colleton County, this is more like an instance of non-specific chest pain. I don't like the way it looks but until there is more information I have to reserve judgement.

  16. Interesting situation here. I agree that the firing appears to be a knee jerk over reaction to something that was somewhat of a private message, but let's look at some more of the issues here (Please hold your fire until you read all of my comments.)

    First, the first article I read that reported this story did state that a doctor (if not the specific doctor Brown had a run in with) was named Ward and that there was reason to believe the cartoon was referring to him. If Brown truly did not intend to disparage any particular doctor at the hospital why not pull a name out of the hat that was not connected to the hospital, like “Dr. Brown”? Given the cartoon, it seems as if Brown wanted to tweak someone's nose.

    Second, although I have seen, and been subject to, situations where management action have far outweighed the alleged basis for disciplinary action, as someone else said, we simply do not know if this was the straw that broke the camel's back. Although the county is hiding behind the line of “this is a personnel matter and thus is confidential ….” I would think they would let the world know that there were other issues involved in the decision if this was not an isolated incident. But the question remains unanswered.

    Third, people have a basic misunderstanding of what the 1st Amendment allows/protects. While practicing law, I found a case in PA where a worker at a youth facility was denied unemployment benefits because he disobeyed an order from a superior about reporting an abusive situation. The worker was told not to go over the supervisor's head and talk to members of the board of directors when he was not satisfied with how the supervisor handled an alleged instance of abuse. Without getting into a constitutional law class, let me just say that there are situations in which government agencies can limit, especially employee's, speech. This is why not all whistle blowers are protected. Certainly if there is a dangerous situation and going through the chain of command has not rectified the situation, it would be appropriate to bring it out in the open. However, if it is a situation where the doctor is a jerk with poor bedside manner, or who refuses to approve orders for the most mundane and simplest inteventions, does that need to go beyond talking with colleagues?

    Fourth, politics and the bottom line will triumph over what is right more often than not. That being the case, if you are on the outside you are not in a position to change anything. Although I agree with the premise that evil will triumph when good people do nothing, doing your job to the best of your ability is one way of fighting the bad things in our system.

    Fifth, I have to take issue with notion that the cartoon would only have been seen by those people directly in Brown's list of friends. I have come across several of the same type of cartoons, as well as other videos (my favorite being “Someone did not lilke “Trauma” from Youtube) that I have passed on to other people. Once something is on the web – anywhere on the web – it is like a wild fire. There is simply no telling which direction it will take or how far it will spread. BUT, just like a poor decision by senior officers fighting a wildfire can cause the fire to spread further, the actions of Colleton County have certainly ensured that the cartoon will be spread with greater distance than if they had handled more appropriately.

    Sixth, whether you say or do something just to tweak someone's nose or whether it is done out of a genuine concern about an issue that affects either an individual or the public's safety, once you make the decision that you can not keep silent, you also have to accept the fact that there may be negative consequences for speaking up. Or for simply doing your job. When I simply did not take orders from a local fire commissioner and walk a patient from an MVC with a severe head injury to my ambulance, I was transferred after the fire commissioner complained. I emphatically agree that there are times when situations exist where, not only as professionals, but as human beings, we need to take a stand and let the chips fall wherever. However, just as the web has brought many positive benefits to our professional lives – such as the ability to communicate throught spaces like this – we have also seen the negative aspects of it, i.e. pictures from calls being posted on the internet with people thereafter losing their jobs. We have to pick and choose where we take stands – especially when those stands can become larger than the underlying message.

    As much as the rebel in me would like srceam about the unfairness and absurdity of the actions of Colleton County, this is more like an instance of non-specific chest pain. I don't like the way it looks but until there is more information I have to reserve judgement.

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